Who is Michael Lacey?

Imagine a world where there were no scientific calculations, or where we applied no science. Chaos would reign supreme. Mathematics as science provides solutions for daily living.

However, we cannot apply math to our daily living without the teacher, the mathematician, and the scientists who keep analyzing how we should apply concepts.

Michael Lacey was born Michael Thoreau Lacey in 1959. Michael worked his way up the education ladder to acquire his first degree from the University of Texas, Austin.

Michael then advanced his studies and graduated with a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1987. His thesis was on probability in Banach spaces. They are logarithmic equations in the functional analysis field that deal with complete norm vector spaces. His thesis also solved a problem related to the Law of Iterated Logarithm.

Michael Lacey is an experienced mathematician who has dedicated most of his life in contributing towards knowledge in his field. He has worked at Louisiana State University, University of North Carolina, and Indiana University. He has been working at the Georgia Institute of Technology from 1996 where he is a professor and the associate chair of the faculty.

During his time at UNC, Michael and his mentor gave their proof of concept to the Central Limit Theorem. This theorem simply suggests that when conducting a study, the average results from the data will be closer to the average results from the whole study if the sample size is increased.

During his successful career, Michael has received recognition and awards. The most notable being the Salem Prize. This he received together with a colleague for studying and completing the Hilbert Transform Equation, which was incomplete. Read more: Michael Lacey |Math Alliance and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

He is an honored member of the Fulbright and Simons fellowships. He used the benefits acquired from these scholarships to support his further studies in the field.

You cannot mention his name without thinking of the Guggenheim Fellowship Award, which he received in 2004. The icing on the cake is the National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowship. He became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society in 2012.

Michael is a lead researcher in the field with hundreds of published research articles to his name. Lacey is also the author of the book ‘On a Conjecture of E.M. Stein on the Hilbert Transform on Vector Fields.’ To date, he continues to serve diligently at the Georgia Institute as a math professor.